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Jonathan Edwards on commonsense as a failure of the imagination

Americans have a long history of touting commonsense as providing a solid foundation for sure knowledge of the world. We’re often skeptical of those whose ideas sound too “theoretical” or “abstract,” and we scoff at people who posit ideas that seem radically contrary to the world as we experience it.

This attitude often displays itself most clearly in how people react to scientific theories. People laugh at the idea that the universe could be made of “strings,” because obviously we don’t experience reality that way. And, many mock the idea of global warming because it happened to be colder in their part of the world the last couple of years. Now, I’m not trying to start an argument about whether these theories, and others, are right. My only point is to comment on how many people use commonsense experience to reject or “refute” more abstract ideas.

For Edwards, this suggests a complete lack of imagination.

I’ve been re-reading Marsden’s Jonathan Edwards: A Life, and this section stood out to me the other day. The specific context has to do with Edward’s philosophical idealism and how contrary to commonsense it is to suggest that the “physical” is not what is ultimately real. But, Marsden goes on to point out that the same imaginative openness to new ideas also characterized Edwards’ approach to scientific developments.

The problem with thinking that commonsense experience was ultimate, he was convinced, was a failure of imagination….’Imagination’ at the time meant literally the faculty by which one forms images of things. The case of prejudices, said Edwards, was that people get so used to perceiving things in common ways that they ‘make what they can actually perceive by their senses, or by immediate and outside reflection into their own souls, the standard of possibility or impossibility; so that there must be no body, forsooth, bigger than they can conceive of, or less than they can see with their eyes; nor motion either much swifter or slower than they can imagine.” (Marsden, Jonathan Edwards, 80)

This isn’t to say that Edwards rejected commonsense. In most situations, commonsense is a fine guide to understanding the world. But, Edwards point is that our perspective is inherently limited. So, if we insist on judging the world on the basis of our own limited experiences, we will necessarily be prejudiced against much larger truths. And, Christians in particular should be able to look beyond our limited horizons and imagine possibilities that border on the absurd.

Flotsam and jetsam (8/5)

Flotsam and jetsam (6/12)

  • Stephen Moshier takes John McArthur to task for his recent critique of the geological principle of uniformitarianism (i.e. geologic processes are the same today as they’ve always been). Moshier points out that McArthur’s definitions and arguments are a little outdated (i.e. he’s criticizing 19th century geology). The post serves as another example that we should be very careful offering authoritative critiques of work done in areas in which we are not specialists (see Giberson on that topic here).
  • Philip Sumpter has finally concluded his extended (to say the least) series on theological interpretation. The posts in the series and the various discussions they sparked are worth perusing if you want to get a feel for the issues.
  • T&T Clark’s “companions” series has been launched with its Companion to Methodism. I’ll be interested to see if they are as helpful as they look like they might be.
  • In a rather shocking development, Pope Benedict has rejected demands for the Catholic Church to reverse its position on clerical celibacy. Did anyone really think this was going to go any differently?
  • Apparently there are lots of sites where you can get your daily news in comic form…in Japanese. Why do they get all the cool comics?
  • And, Matt Mikalatos discusses why Denver International Airport is watched over by the Egyptian god of death and other unusual stories about the airport (including its very own smoke monster). I connect through Denver quite a bit, so I paid attention to this one. I think I’m going to start flying through Minneapolis more instead.