Blog Archives

Flotsam and jetsam (8/28)

Some good links for your Saturday reading pleasure:

  • Sharon Baker explains why she thinks we need to seriously rethink our understanding of hell.
  • Carl Trueman wraps up his reflections on Luther’s writings against the Jews by reflecting on what we can learn from all of this today.
  • Peter Leithart discusses the shame/guilt dichotomy and summarizes Douglas Cairns’ argument that the classical external/internal framework usually used to understand shame and guilt simply does not hold up to scrutiny – unless you understand it as a political move to make the private spirituality of the Enlightenment look superior.
  • Jonathan links to some free book giveaways. You can pick up books on biblical theology, leadership, and apologetics.
  • Boyd Morrison has some good thoughts on the decision of whether to self-publish.
  • Steve Holmes discusses the New Perspective, arguing that the criticism that the Protestant tradition has prioritized justification over union with Christ is wrong. Instead, he suggests that union with Christ has been central (at least to Reformed theology) from the very beginning.
  • Fred Sanders has an outstanding reflection on the passing of Donald Bloesch. This is a must read if you want to understand who Bloesch was and why he’s important.
  • And,  if you’re a Star Trek TNG fan, you should check out this casting memo discussing actors originally considered for key roles. Wesley Snipes as Geordi? What, is there a terrorist on the Enterprise somewhere?

Donald G. Bloesch (1928-2010)

Donald Bloesch, professor emeritus at the University of Dubuque Theological Seminary and a longtime conservative voice for renewal in the United Church of Christ, passed away on Tuesday. Bloesch had been influential evangelical voice for over 40 years through a wide range of writings, but particular his Essentials of Evangelical Theology and Christian Foundations series.

I first encountered Bloesch during my seminary years, and he quickly became one of my favorite evangelical theologians. I appreciated his careful thinking, his critical engagement with a wide range of biblical scholars and theologians, and his evangelical appropriation of Karl Barth’s theology. In many ways, he modeled how a committed evangelical can and should engage a broad range of theological voices. I’m sure that I’m not alone in saying that his contributions have been greatly appreciated and his voice will be missed.