Blog Archives

Kevin Vanhoozer on “Redramatizing Theology”

Kevin Vanhoozer gave three talks at Covenant Seminary last spring, and they’ve just posted the audio files on their website. (HT)

This is a nice addition to the two lectures that Vanhoozer gave at Southeastern Seminary last fall on “Doing Faith: Seeking (and Showing) Understanding in Company with Christ.” (HT Justin Taylor)

PART ONE – The Theater of the gospel: the stage, the script, and the director

Prologue: The pastor-theologian as minister of understanding

I. The stage

II. The Christian control story: theodrama

  1. The Christian theodrama is eucatastrophic
  2. The Christian theodrama involves divine entrances and exoduses
  3. The Christian theodrama is Trinitarian

III. The script

  1. The nature of Scripture: Spirited discourse
  2. The function of Scripture: cultivating canon sense
  3. The authority of Scripture: cultivating catholic sensibility

IV. Doctrine as direction

  1. Knowing God is itself dramatic.
  2. Understanding the theodrama: fitting participation

V. The director and the dramaturg

  1. The dramaturg
  2. The director
  3. Church as company of players

PART TWO – Gospel Theater: Rehearsing, Improvising, Performing

I. Role-playing: from Stanisklavski to sanctification

  1. Doctrine and identity
  2. The ‘System’
  3. The disciple’s vocation: being real

II. Discipleship as improvisation

  1. Spontaneity
  2. Accepting and blocking ‘offers’
  3. Narrative skills
  4. Reincorporation

III. “Doing” church: the theater of the gospel

  1. Performing the Scriptures: the costumed interpreter
  2. Performing the doctrine of atonement
  3. A plea for amateur theology: acting in parables

Flotsam and jetsam (7/22)

Interview with Driscoll on “Doctrine”

Justin Taylor has an interesting interview with Mark Driscoll over at Between Two Worlds. The interview focuses on the new book that he has co-authored with Gerry Breshears, Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe. I’m planning to post on the book sometime this summer (I should probably read it first). The interview is particularly helpful for understanding some of the back story involved in writing the book.

The comments following the interview are also interesting. Although (unsurprisingly), some of the comments veer in some unhelpful directions, several made some interesting comments about the the rhetorical devices Mark uses to critique his opponents even when he’s not doing it overtly.