Blog Archives

Creativity isn’t magic – how innovations really happen

The act of creation is surrounded by a fog of myths – myths that creativity comes by an inspiration, that original creations break the mold, that they’re the products of geniuses, and appear as quickly as electricity can heat a filament. But, creativity isn’t magic. It happens by applying ordinary tools of thought to existing materials.

That’s how this video on creativity and innovations begins. It goes on to explain that creativity involves three basic elements: copying, transforming, and combining. Check it out.

The latest issue of ATI looks outstanding – check it out

If you’re not following the American Theology Inquiry journal (ATI), you really should. It’s a free online journal that just seems to be getting better with each issue. The latest issue of the journal just came out and it looks great. I’ll definitely be digging into some of these as soon as I get the chance.

Here are the articles in this issue:

  • “Reassessing the Relation of Reformation and Orthodoxy: A Methodological Rejoinder”, Richard A. Mueller
  • Discovering the Sacred in Secular Art: An Aesthetic Modality that ‘Speaks of God'”,  Christopher Evan Longhurst
  • A Match Made in Munich: The Origin of Grenz’s Trinitarian Theology,” Jason S. Sexton
  • “The Best Man Is Only a Man: Reflections on Some Enchantments and Disenchantments of the Grail,” Charles M. Natoli
  • “There Is No Sex in the Church,” Fr. Sergei Sveshnikov
  • “The Parable of the Budding Fig Tree,” J. Lyle Story

Words – a visual poem

Here’s a beautiful “visual poem” from Radiolab on the intersection of words, thoughts, and everyday life. You can see more from Radiolab on a “world without words” here.

HT

Flotsam and jetsam (5/14)

What could be better on a sunny Friday morning in Portland (or, wherever you are) than a Grease-themed video tribute to Wayne Grudem! I think I’ll need counseling after this one.

  • If you haven’t been following the many discussions taking place around the blogosphere on James Davison Hunter’s To Change the World, CT has a nice series of posts that should help you get caught up. Chuck Colson, Andy Crouch, and Christopher Benson all off their perspectives.
  • The T&T Clark blog has a guest post by Riemer Roukema introducing his book Jesus, Gnosis, and Dogma. I can’t say that the summary sounds like anything groundbreaking, but for those interested in historical Jesus studies, it might be worth a look.
  • Anyone interested in a $189,000 iPad should check here.
  • Per crucem ad lucem offers a brief summary of key reasons that people think images of Jesus are idolatrous, including a very nice summary of Barth and Calvin on the subject, before arguing that the visual arts can be a powerful, though potentially risky, theological resource. This is a good follow up piece for Andreas’ paper on icons and iconoclams in the theology of St. John of Damascus.
  • Kevin DeYoung offers some thoughts on why confession of sin is important in the life of the believer and the believing community.