Flotsam and jetsam (11/9)

  • Michael Patton reflects on “closet doctrines” – those doctrines we believe but prefer not to admit to non-Christians.

Closet doctrines are those doctrines that we might believe, but we hide, especially to those for whom Christian truth is a novelty. In short, they are those beliefs that we are somewhat embarrassed by.

the experiential nature of faith, the spiritual mark of delight in God, and the expectation of pervasive joy are not the inventions of John Piper. Nor are they owing only to the influence of Edwards and the Great Awakening. They go back to the Reformers themselves.

What am I getting at? I am concerned that evangelicals, by and large, approach the OT with an unbiblical dependency on the NT. Since the NT is newer revelation and offers a more developed view of God’s redeeming purposes, it becomes the key by which we “unlock” the meaning of what has come before it. There is no overt discrimination against the OT, just a lack of deep engagement with it as meaningful, relevant revelation in its own right.

  • And, here’s an interesting list of 10 movies stuck in development hell. Hollywood definitely needs to get some of these taken care of. I don’t care if they ever make a movie about Halo, but Ender’s Game would be fabulous and The Sandman is long overdue.

About Marc Cortez

Theology Prof and Dean at Western Seminary, husband, father, & blogger, who loves theology, church history, ministry, pop culture, books, and life in general.

Posted on November 9, 2010, in Misc and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

  1. Hey Marc. Have you read Gibson’s book? If so, what did you make of it? One hopes that one pens fair reviews.

  2. I noticed Gibson footnotes Marc at least a couple of times in the early part of the book, that’s great!

  3. Well, of course. I did write a groundbreaking new work that completely transformed Barth studies forever 🙂

    Sadly, I haven’t had the chance to do more than glance through Gibson’s book. I’m hoping to do more with it soon since he touches on a number of issues in Barth’s theology that I’m very interested in. But, from what I’ve seen, Jason, I think you did a great job with the review.

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