Flotsam and jetsam (5/14)

What could be better on a sunny Friday morning in Portland (or, wherever you are) than a Grease-themed video tribute to Wayne Grudem! I think I’ll need counseling after this one.

  • If you haven’t been following the many discussions taking place around the blogosphere on James Davison Hunter’s To Change the World, CT has a nice series of posts that should help you get caught up. Chuck Colson, Andy Crouch, and Christopher Benson all off their perspectives.
  • The T&T Clark blog has a guest post by Riemer Roukema introducing his book Jesus, Gnosis, and Dogma. I can’t say that the summary sounds like anything groundbreaking, but for those interested in historical Jesus studies, it might be worth a look.
  • Anyone interested in a $189,000 iPad should check here.
  • Per crucem ad lucem offers a brief summary of key reasons that people think images of Jesus are idolatrous, including a very nice summary of Barth and Calvin on the subject, before arguing that the visual arts can be a powerful, though potentially risky, theological resource. This is a good follow up piece for Andreas’ paper on icons and iconoclams in the theology of St. John of Damascus.
  • Kevin DeYoung offers some thoughts on why confession of sin is important in the life of the believer and the believing community.

About Marc Cortez

Theology Prof and Dean at Western Seminary, husband, father, & blogger, who loves theology, church history, ministry, pop culture, books, and life in general.

Posted on May 14, 2010, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 2 Comments.

  1. The interview Derek Keefe does with Hunter in CT is well worth the read also. It gives good, engaging highlights of the book. In particular, Hunter’s comments on power from a Christian perspective and his placing together as Nietzschean compatriots folks as (seemingly) diverse as Hauerwas and Dobson is provocative and worth considering. Here is how Hunter ends the interview – just to give you a little taste:

    Christians need to abandon talk about “redeeming the culture,” “advancing the kingdom,” and “changing the world.” Such talk carries too much weight, implying conquest and domination. If there is a possibility for human flourishing in our world, it does not begin when we win the culture wars but when God’s word of love becomes flesh in us, reaching every sphere of social life. When faithful presence existed in church history, it manifested itself in the creation of hospitals and the flourishing of art, the best scholarship, the most profound and world-changing kind of service and care—again, not only for the household of faith but for everyone. Faithful presence isn’t new; it’s just something we need to recover.

    • Thanks for the quote. If anyone’s interested in chasing this further, Scot McKnight did a 10-post series on the book at JesusCreed and Kevin DeYoung had a couple of pretty critical posts on his Gospel Coalition blog.

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